16 tips for getting 90 percent of your work done before lunch

work smarter

“You can get 90 percent or more of your work done in the morning. How? I’m going to give you 16 amazing productivity tips, but first let me set the stage:

  • First, I’m defining work as stuff that you do (important stuff). Ideally, meetings can be shoved out of the picture.
  • Second, this approach is built on the Pareto principle. The Pareto principle states that 80 percent of your results come from 20 percen of your efforts. Getting your work done in the morning means that you can take a leaner approach to the important tasks —a smart approach.

1_Schedule your day the night before
Every day, you should list all your tasks and when you’re going to do them the following day. You will not be productive unless you plan out everything you’re going to do the next morning (but don’t schedule too much: keep your to-do schedule light to actually accomplish real work).

2_Clean your office the night before
Clutter in your office creates distractions. A sticky note on your desk that says ‘Call Bob ASAP!’ can throw off your whole day. Showing up to work in a spic-and-span environment helps you to think clearer and work harder.

3_Wake up at an ungodly hour
To really get stuff done, you’ve got to get up in time to make it happen. I recommend anytime from 5:30 to 6:30 a.m. If your morning routine takes a little longer, bump your wake-up time back a little more. Obviously, you’ll need to adjust your bedtime accordingly.

4_Exercise
Scientific evidence shows that morning exercise can make us think better, work better and become more productive. Harvard’s John Ratey is the author of Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain. He writes that exercise is essential for reaching ‘high-performance levels in intellectually demanding jobs’.

5_Stick to your schedule
Don’t let yourself veer off the course that you’ve mapped out. You have a limited amount of time. Don’t ruin the schedule. Take your schedule, allow it guide you, and you’ll be able to accomplish more.

6_Give yourself 20 minutes to reach flow
Flow is when you’re in the zone. This happens when you are completely absorbed in your activity, singlemindedly accomplishing things at a high level and rapid pace. It takes some time to reach flow, so if you don’t feel productive or engaged in your work, just give it some time.

7_Make 60-second decisions
Decision making is a time-draining vortex. When you’re faced with a decision in the course of your work, give yourself a one-minute limit. Your decision will be just as good, but it will take less time.

8_Wear headphones
Headphones can shut out distractions and keep you focused. Harvard Business Review advises workers to put on their headphones to be more productive.

9_Do the toughest tasks first
Mark Twain wrote: ‘If you eat a frog first thing in the morning that will probably be the worst thing you do all day’. Brian Tracy turned this statement into an entire principal (and even wrote a book on it: Eat that frog!). If you get your biggest and ugliest task done first, the rest of the day will be massively productive.

10_Do your writing early on
Writing is one of the most mentally demanding tasks. However, writing also has the power of focusing your brain and improving your productivity. Do you writing early in the day, and you’ll improve both the quality of your writing and the rest of your day.

11_Don’t commute
If you typically have a lengthy work commute, do everything you can to avoid it. It’s not just wasted time that you want to guard against. It’s the mental havoc. A commute is one of the most stressful parts of the day. Starting your workday with that level of stress can completely ruin your productivity.

12. Don’t hold meetings (even over the phone)
If you’ve been in business for very long, you know that most meetings are a waste of time. Avoid meetings if at all possible.

13_Don’t check your email first thing
The electronic communication pipeline can be as destructive as meetings. Sure, you need to deal with email. It’s important, but don’t let it swallow your day by starting out with it.

14_Stick to a routine
If you do something repeatedly, you’ll be able to do it better and faster each time. Once you find a routine, stick with it. Your routine is the ramp to your productivity.

15_Make yourself comfortable
Do whatever you need to do to position yourself for success. If that means showering, shaving, eating breakfast, journaling, meditating, feeding the dog or opening the blinds, then do it. When you accomplish these preparatory tasks, you are creating an environment that will make you more productive.

16. Reward yourself at a certain time
Set the clock (a countdown timer if you have to). At a certain point, you’re going to stop. So, stop. Break out the kazoos, throw some confetti, and do your happy dance. It’s time to reward yourself.

Getting 90 percent of your work done in the morning just means that you might get more than 100 percent of your work done every day.”

Neil Patel co-founder of Crazy Egg, Hello Bar and KISSmetrics

posa un antropòleg a la teva empresa

personal thoughts

S’ha descobert que a l’hora de decidir qualsevol cosa, la cadira on seus -si és més dura o més còmode- influeix molt més del que a priori es podria pensar. I tot es deu a que el nostre subconscient té un paper molt més destacat del que es creia fins ara en la presa de decisions.

A la llum d’aquest descobriment, si jo tingues una empresa que fabriqués productes en massa no dubtaria gens a contractar un antropòleg per així poder comprendre millor el comportament dels meus clients i usuaris.

how to make the decisions that will define you

improve yourself

“Always go with the hard choice.

Here’s why:
_Effort creates its own reward
_Hard choices build outstanding reputations
_Luck is occasional, but intent lasts forever
_The angel lies in the details
_The hard choice is always binary”

Jeff Haden ghostwriter, speaker and Inc Magazine columnist

are you making this mistake at the end of your meetings?

work smarter

“Have you been in meetings where lots of decisions are made but nothing gets done and nobody is held accountable? Unless you finish the meeting with commitments about “who will do what by when,” you’ve just built 90% of a bridge.

a) Ask and you shall receive
To make a clear request you must utter it in the first person, using direct language and addressing it to a specific person. You must specify observable conditions of satisfaction, including time. It helps if you explain your purpose for asking, and, if and when you arrive at an oral contract, always ask the other sign it.

b) Time to commit
A well-formed request demands a clear response.
There are only three possible answers:
1. Yes, I commit.
2. No, I decline.
3. I can’t commit yet because: a. I need clarification; b. I need to check; I promise to respond by X; c. I want to propose an alternative; d. I can make it only if I get Y by Z.”

Fred K. professor of Leadership and Coaching, author of Conscious Business